Rolls-Royce Boat Tail, the most expensive car in the world, receives a wooden replica

The wooden replica Rolls-Royce Boat Tail also features an electrically opening rear deck which houses a courtesy tray, just like the real Boat Tail.

Through HT automatic office
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Updated:
Jan 15, 2022, 10:56 AM

Screenshot from a video posted on YouTube by ND – Woodworking Art

Rolls-Royce introduced its most expensive offering last year – the four-seater Boat Tail luxury car. While some can afford it through the automaker’s Coachbuild program, many can only dream of it. But a carpenter artist has created his own wooden version of the world’s most expensive car, albeit not blue.

The artist posted a YouTube video of the making of the scaled-down version of the Rolls-Royce Boat Tail that seats two and can also be driven. The wooden version also features a power-opening aft deck that houses a courtesy tray filled with glasses and juice, just like the real Boat Tail. The rear axle opens like butterfly doors, just like how it works on the original version. There’s even a holder for an umbrella that can be opened by remote control.

(Also read | Watch: This wooden Ferrari SF90 Spider toy car has working steering and suspension)

The carpenter artist built the wooden Boat Tail replica for his son and the project took 68 days. The 16-minute video shows the wooden model’s journey from when it was just pieces of wood to when it was driven on roads. It can be seen that the construction of the vehicle begins with only pieces of wood taken from abandoned trees, two axles and an electric motor.

A simple chain drive from the motor can be seen spinning the rear wheels while a disc brake can slow it down. The model also has working lights all around the exterior and interior, and the proper reverse-opening “suicide” doors have been replicated for passenger entry and exit. A Rolls-Royce logo adorns the front of the vehicle. The artist uses a variety of tools including chainsaws, angle grinders and hand chisels in the construction of this wooden boat tail.

Date of first publication: Jan 15, 2022, 10:56 a.m. IST

Floyd N. Morlan